Indigenous Peoples’ Day

Journal of Gender, Social Policy, and the Law’s Indigenous Peoples’ Day Primer

 

What is Indigenous Peoples’ Day?

Indigenous Peoples’ Day is a global celebration of indigenous people around the world. In the United States and other countries in the Western Hemisphere, it is meant to replace Columbus Day, which celebrated the “discovery” of the Americas by Christopher Columbus. Many indigenous groups recognize this celebration of “discovery” and Columbus Day ignores the subjugation of indigenous populations across the Western Hemisphere, which includes genocide, ethnic cleansing, and other issues associated with systemic racism. Although Indigenous Peoples’ Day is celebrated around the world, the resources below are primarily restricted to issues indigenous people in the United States have faced and continue to endure. Juliette Jackson, 2L, and member of the Klamath Tribes of Oregon, is reviving the Native American Law Students Association (NALSA) at the Washington College of Law. If you identify as an indigenous person or are a non-native student with an interest in tribal law, and would like more information on how to join NALSA, please contact, [email protected]

Why “Indigenous Peoples’ Day” instead of “Columbus Day”?

Articles

Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women

Natives Are Not Your Mascot

Mauna Kea

#NoDAPL & other Pipelines

Native American Civil Rights Movement

Stolen Children

Cultural Protections & Language Revitalization

US Federal Agencies & Institutions

Court Cases/Congressional Acts

Other Indian Law Resources

Media:

Social media accounts to follow (IG/Twitter):

  • @ncai1944
  • @ndn.o
  • @sacredlandsnativehands
  • @lakotalaw
  • @lilnativeboy
  • @nativewomenswilderness
  • @therednationmovement

Podcasts

Music

This primer was created by Mary Marston, Junior Staffer of JGSPL with the assistance of Juliette Jackson, member of the Klamath Tribes of Oregon; Quinn Buchwald, member the Mackinac Bands of Chippewa and Ottawa Indians and Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa of Indians; and Professor Ezra Rosser of WCL, who specializes in laws regarding Indian Nations and Indigenous Peoples.